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Essay Archives View as a list

4 July 2007: Examining Politics in America on our 231st Birthday

As our nation pauses to celebrate its birthday many things vie for our people’s attention. There is the drain of human life and treasure in the ill-begotten, mismanaged war in Iraq; the emotional and divisive debate over reforming immigration; the growing gap between the rich and the poor with the top ten per cent of …

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Q & A:

I have sung in church choirs all my life and still enjoy it.

However, in some of the music, especially Scandinavian music and

often at Christmas time, the lyrics frequently include this

comment, "Christ is coming soon." Can you tell me where this

idea has arisen? It seems to be a rather peculiar tenet.

Read the Answer...

27 June 2007: This is Not the Word of the Lord!

I went to my own parish church on a Sunday in June. The music was excellent. The sermon delivered by the Rev. Dr. James Jones, an honorary and part time member of the staff of St. Peter’s Church in Morristown, New Jersey, was one of the best I have heard in years. The summer congregation …

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Q & A:

Where can I find the hymns, etc. written to express the beliefs your

writings have developed?

Read the Answer...

20 June 2007: The Lambeth Conference of 2008 and the Curious Behavior of the Archbishop of Canterbury

The Archbishop of Canterbury, the Right Honorable and Most Reverend Rowan Williams, announced recently that he would not invite the Rt. Rev. V. Gene Robinson, the Episcopal Bishop of New Hampshire, to attend the Lambeth Conference scheduled for the year 2008 in England. It was the latest in a series of decisions made by this …

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Q & A:

Protestant churches in the U.S. seem to believe in a "second coming of

Christ." What do you believe?

Read the Answer...

13 June 2007: The Third Fundamental: The Substitution by Death of Jesus on the Cross Brings Salvation, Part III

Like the first two of the five Fundamentals that we have thus far examined, this third one has also become not just unbelievable but bizarre to modern ears. Yet it remains so powerful that it still shapes the liturgy of Churches across the spectrum from the Roman Catholics to the Pentecostals. The words: “Jesus died …

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Q & A:

The idea of calling God "He" bothers me. Although I had a loving father, in

my 28 years of teaching I have come in contact with many who were abusive.

One year, a grandmother came in for a parent conference and revealed that

her granddaughter's father, under the guise of saying goodnight prayers with

his daughter, sexually abused her for years. I wonder how this girl will be

able to receive God's message when she continually hears God referred to as

"He"? Even the hymns are filled with references to "Him." Fortunately, our

current pastors use "God" — not the pronoun — and few in the

church have noticed. I write on behalf of all the girls of this world who,

like my beloved student, have been hurt deeply by their fathers.

Read the Answer...

6 June 2007: The Third Fundamental: The Substitution by Death of Jesus on the Cross Brings Salvation, Part II

Last week we began our analysis of the third fundamental that traditional Christians stated, in the Tractarian Movement in the early years of the 20th century, was basic to a proper understanding of Christianity. It focused on what Christians came to call “the doctrine of the Atonement.” In many ways it proclaims a barbaric understanding …

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Q & A:

The idea of calling God "He" bothers me. Although I had a loving father, in

my 28 years of teaching I have come in contact with many who were abusive.

One year, a grandmother came in for a parent conference and revealed that

her granddaughter's father, under the guise of saying goodnight prayers with

his daughter, sexually abused her for years. I wonder how this girl will be

able to receive God's message when she continually hears God referred to as

"He"? Even the hymns are filled with references to "Him." Fortunately, our

current pastors use "God" — not the pronoun — and few in the

church have noticed. I write on behalf of all the girls of this world who,

like my beloved student, have been hurt deeply by their fathers.

Read the Answer...

30 May 2007: The Substitutionary Death of Jesus on the Cross Alone Brings Salvation: Part One

It is hard in our generation to put into a single sentence the substance of the Third Fundamental that traditional Christians, at the beginning of the 20th century, said was essential to the Christian faith. Officially, it is referred to as “The doctrine of the substitutionary atonement through God’s grace and human faith.” Those words …

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Q & A:

I once worshiped and sang in a parish that was presided over by a

brilliant gay priest who preached against gays. I knew he was gay; I knew

his sub rosa partner well. Like so many people, I remained silent about his

homophobic preaching since I believed (and still do) that one's sexuality

and personal life are just that — personal. I was disturbed as he

cemented a "traditional, conservative" parish, based on the primacy of men,

the unsuitability of women for the priesthood and other policy roles in the

Church, a hypocritical disdain for homosexuals, and stunningly beautiful

liturgy and music. Then an Anglican bishop at the Lambeth Conference said

he was appalled and called the Church heretical for allowing a Native

American priest to celebrate the Mass in his own language and use the

language's word for Great Spirit as a translation for God. That did it for

me. I could no longer associate with a view of the world and the deity that

was essentially — although the parishioners would never have seen that

— fundamentalist. I left that church — and all organized

Christianity — after that.

I applaud your quest. Reading your columns and editorials is now my only

connection with active Christianity. Thank you.

Read the Answer...

23 May 2007: The Death of Jerry Falwell

He represented everything that repels me about religion. He was closed-minded, bigoted and abusive as religious people tend to be when they believe that they possess God’s truth. Yet, I never disliked this man. He tapped into something in the American psyche that, had he not done so, I believe, someone else, perhaps worse, would …

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Q & A:

A brief note from a South African who has benefited from your e-mailed

articles. Thank you for spelling out a different theological approach so

clearly and sincerely. I will be obtaining your new book as soon as it

becomes available here.

I have become rather sad and angry about the way in which clergy and church

lay leaders have sold members down the river for so many years. People have

not been encouraged to question, doubt, and debate, but have been presented

with a party line and told to believe it or else! The average church member

has never been exposed to the theological teaching you and many theological

schools present. Certainly in South Africa, the majority of Christians are

fundamentalist/evangelical types, who are totally dismissive of anyone who

thinks differently. I find it more and more difficult to minister to my

congregations with integrity, and look forward to retiring in a few years

time!

Read the Answer...

16 May 2007: SA Weekend in Minneapolis with the Twin Cities Gay Men’s Chorus

“I’m not afraid of your Yahweh, I’m not afraid of your Allah, I’m not afraid of your Jesus, But I am afraid of what you do in the name of your God” Dear Friends, These were the words of one of the pieces of music featured recently in a concert in Minneapolis, Minnesota. It was …

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Q & A:

Given that the authors of the gospels were Jewish, why were the Jews instead of the Romans vilified and held

responsible for the death of Jesus? Making Jews responsible for Jesus" death justified incredible violence against the

Jews.

Read the Answer...

9 May 2007: Special Question and Answers from Bishop Spong

Dear Friends, This week I will break momentarily my series on the rise of fundamentalism in America to cover a few pressing issues that I experience and that you, my readers, keep bringing to my attention. Today I will take you inside your television screen and show you what goes into even four minute segments. …

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Q & A:

My husband and I really enjoyed "Sins of Scripture." We were

both raised Catholic and now belong to what you so accurately refer to as

the Church Alumni Association. My family consists of Polish immigrants, so

they are what I call "fundamentalist Catholics." Think Irish Catholic...it

is that sort of fervor and dedication to the Church and the belief that the

Catholic Church is the only true Church. The Poles are not different.

We are now facing a dilemma. We did not get married in a

Catholic Church, which you can imagine caused a lot of grief. We have

"lost" some family members as a result, who are no longer speaking to us.

We just had our first baby, and the pressure is on to have him baptized

immediately.

We have gently told my family that there will be no baptism.

They are beside themselves. It is one thing to deny ourselves the Kingdom

of Heaven they say but to cast our own child into the pit of hell because of

our own sin and stupidity, well, it is unforgivable in their eyes. Friends

of my father have urged him to "take the matter into his own hands," by

which I think they mean to simply baptize our son without our consent. My

father turns a bright red/purple with rage when the topic comes up and I

fear he is going to give himself a heart attack...at which point I feel

intense guilt and think maybe I should just give the man peace of mind that

his grandson will not wind up in hell for all of eternity. I think it is

absolutely absurd that anyone would characterize the perfect loving God I

experience as this scary monster throwing unbaptized children into hell, or

even purgatory, which are concepts I don't believe in anyway...you get the

point, this is why I "dropped out" in the first place.

So, I come to you with a request. Since we do not have the

wealth of theological knowledge to back up our feelings about God, and they

(the fundamentalist Catholics) have the backing of the Pope, the Bishops and

the "Church," my husband and I often stutter out a bunch of "We

believe...statements which just irritate the fundamentalist Catholics even

more because, in their eyes, it does not matter what "we believe," it

matters what "the Church" thinks.

Can you advise us on how we can gently help my fundamentalist

Catholic family members to respect our decision? We really need your help

on this because I'm afraid we are about to lose more family members and,

instead of losing them, we would really like to live in harmony and mutual

respect with them.

Read the Answer...

2 May 2007: Discussing Biblical Theology on CBS Television

The medium of television is a fascinating place through which to seek to dispel the ignorance of biblical fundamentalism. The time is always short, the network needs to be “fair and balanced” and neither the producer nor the interviewer is necessarily well versed in the subject matter. To push against these barriers in a brief …

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Q & A:

Thank you so much for your series on the rise of fundamental

Christianity. I particularly enjoyed the essay that described the Five

Fundamentals and the one on the First Fundamental - the inerrancy of the

Bible. I have wondered whether the Bible itself ever claims to be the

inerrant word of God. I recognize the difficulty of this question, since

the Bible itself is a hodgepodge of many books that have been bundled

together over the ages. What I have found, however, is that discussing

biblical scholarship with fundamentalists usually gets me precisely nowhere.

They are unwilling to recognize that Moses could not have written the Torah,

or that the gospels were written years after Jesus' death. They continue to

believe that the books of the Bible arose more or less intact in that

particular order and mystically assembled themselves into a unit. They

insist that the obvious contradictions or factual errors are just our

misunderstanding of "the Word." They propose that the "texts of terror"

have been misinterpreted to justify the social evils of slavery, racism, and

sexism, or - worse - fundamentalists continue to quietly believe that these

social evils are indeed ordained by God! So, I want to take the argument

back into their court. I want to challenge the fundamentalists to prove to

me, via the Bible, that the Bible actually claims to be the inerrant word of

God. If the Bible itself doesn't claim it, why do they believe such an

outlandish claim? And my question to you is: does the Bible anywhere make

this claim?

Read the Answer...

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