Log in | Sign up | Contact us | Cancel my account | Get help

Essay Archives View as a list

30 June 2011: Examining the Meaning of the Resurrection, Part V: The “How” Question — What Was the Context in Which Easter Dawned?

We come now to our fourth and final question in search of the meaning of Easter.  Then with clues, hopefully well established, I will seek to draw some conclusions in the final column in this series.  We have thus far identified Simon Peter as the person who stood in the center of the resurrection experience …

Read More…

Q & A:

The Wyoming legislature is considering laws that would make it illegal to apply Shariah laws in our courts.  That is incredibly stupid, I know, but apparently that movement is sweeping the country.  Seems to me that since those espousing such laws say they are like Old Testament laws and a few years ago we had Christian Reconstructionists wanting to make Old Testament law the law of the land.  Comments for your articles?

Read the Answer...

23 June 2011: Examining the Meaning of the Resurrection, Part IV: What is the Meaning of Three Days?

First, we asked who stood at the center of the Easter experience and Peter emerged from our study as the one in whom the meaning of resurrection dawned.  Then we asked “where” Peter and the disciples were when Easter broke into their consciousness and our study led us to the primacy of the Galilean tradition …

Read More…

Q & A:

I have read four of your books since December 23 and feel a guilt-free spiritual awakening.  Raised Episcopalian, I had to leave out most of the words in the creeds when omitting the words I believe.  You bring the spirit rather than just the letter of the law and explain inconsistencies beautifully.  I feel as if I can talk with fundamentalists now when promoting social issues, especially relating to the environment and women.  Thank you so much for your risky writing.

Read the Answer...

16 June 2011: Examining the Meaning of the Resurrection, Part III: Where Were the Disciples When They Saw?

When people have a life-changing experience, they tend to freeze in their minds forever where they were and even what they were doing when the news broke or the new awareness entered their world.  I can recall to this day where I was when, as a ten-year old child, I heard the news of the …

Read More…

Q & A:

Have you come across a book called The Jesus Mysteries?  I think it makes a very good case for the possibility that Jesus as a man never actually existed.  For one thing it is surprising that such a remarkable person has no mention at all in any writing of his time. (Of course, he would not have been called Jesus, which is a Greek name, more likely Joshua.  If he was real why was he not given his true Aramaic name?)  Second, it would not be surprising if one (the writer of Mark’s gospel) was writing a myth, that he would set it a few decades in the past so that it would not be so easy to refute.  Third, it would account for the other gospels being different, as each elaborated a further fiction.  Fourth, it would entirely account for the references back to the Old Testament prophesies, as the story was written around them.  It does appear that Saul (aka Paul) had set out to replace Judaism with a religion to which others in the Roman Empire could also belong.  I realize that after a lifetime of biblical study, you may find it hard to accept this possibility.  Perhaps that could be the big secret that the Vatican has hidden all these years?

Read the Answer...

9 June 2011: Thoughts on the Future of Christianity After a Conversation with the Founder of the Alban Institute

Several weeks ago I had the opportunity to have lunch with the Rev. Dr. Loren B. Mead, known to many of you as the creator of the Alban Institute.  A think tank operation, funded largely over the last fifty years with grants from major foundations, the Alban Institute has studied and made recommendations on every …

Read More…

Q & A:

I’ve been reading your book Liberating the Gospels.  Your well supported hypothesis that the gospels are midrashic stories that cast light on the core stories of Jesus as they were understood at the time makes perfect sense.  I find it interesting that with the four gospels, the writing gets better with each one, Mark through John.   My problem is that Jesus is a “character” different in the mind of each evangelist, who does things essentially made up by the writer, perhaps some based on a verbal tradition, perhaps not.  My question is how do I get closer to understanding Jesus as a person?  Or is it a matter of always “seeing through a glass darkly?  I’m at the point in your book where you discuss the Gospel of John, which brings up the memory of when my New Testament professor, Sherman Johnson, listed 13 reasons supporting the idea that John was the earliest gospel.

Read the Answer...

1 June 2011: Examining the Meaning of the Resurrection, Part II: Who Stood in the Center of the Easter Breakthrough?

We begin our probe into the meaning of the Easter moment by asking who it was who stood in the center of the Easter experience. People do not always recognize that the claim of revealed truth requires both a revelation and a receiver of that revelation. The revelation may be of a timeless truth, but …

Read More…

Q & A:

I recall reading recently a request from a follower asking if you have ever considered producing a TV program.  Frankly, I don’t think a TV program is effective for “this form of teaching/lectures.”  However, over the last month I have discovered an excellent educational organization, The Great Courses.  I do not know what business conditions apply to producing lecture/courses for them (the religion courses that I purchase are all presented by excellent lecturers, including Professor Amy-Jill Levine, Professor Bart D. Ehrman and Professor Emeritus James Hall.)  Although I’m almost certain that a Bishop easily qualifies as a professor equivalent.  Regardless, I am certain that your courses would outsell almost all of its contemporary (traditional) religious programs-and I would be one of your biggest customers.  Anyway I wanted to pass this information along.  Their website is at www.aboutgreatcourses.com.

Read the Answer...

25 May 2011: Examining the Meaning of the Resurrection, Part I: Setting the Stage

Through this column during the weeks before Good Friday, I did a series on the story of the cross and its meaning, seeking to call you, my readers, into a more interpretive way of reading the passion narrative.  I focused on the developing nature of that narrative and sought to show that when the first …

Read More…

Q & A:

It has been our privilege to hear your lectures at Highlands, and they are always exciting and provocative. We feel your message to the world is “Copernican” in scope and potential.  We have read all your books through the years, but I don’t recall you ever addressing the idea of the concept of the “Origin of God” in humanity’s time.  Do you have a hunch or idea or knowledge of when this concept entered the human drama?

Read the Answer...

18 May 2011: New Dean for the Seminary at Drew University: A Rising Star in Theological Education

One of the most enriching elements of my life today is the relationship I have with Drew University in Madison, New Jersey. Located about five miles from my home, Drew began its life as a theological school designed to train clergy for the Methodist Church. Only later did this theological school grow into being both …

Read More…

Q & A:

Just recently I have become perplexed over an alleged saying of Jesus.  Supposedly he admonishes us to Take up our personal cross and follow him.  It seems odd that he could have said that before he, himself, had done so.  Was that just a pious thought plugged in by his successors?  What does the Jesus Seminar say about it?

Read the Answer...

11 May 2011: Nebraska: Bright Lights in America’s Heartland

Mutual of Omaha. Warren Buffet and Nebraska Football! These are the best known icons of the Cornhusker State of Nebraska. In my mind there will always be one more. Roman Lee Hruska, who represented Nebraska in the United States Senate from 1954 to 1976. Senator Hruska had a distinguished career as a vocal fiscal conservative, …

Read More…

Q & A:

A recent question in your column from Mark Dickinson of Ottawa touched a very sore nerve in me. I am an Anglican priest in Ontario and have, for many years, observed the need for intense revision of what is taught in our Sunday schools. Taking the position that a plant starts from a seed and grows into a tree, for example, the process evident is that the seed must be nurtured in order to achieve its potential. It must come from the bottom up. Having been raised Roman Catholic and converting to Anglicanism after my four years’ service during WW II, I can attest to the extreme difficulty in wrenching what I was taught about religion out of my gut. I say gut because there it is and there it remains to this day. It is a constant battle. Therefore, it is imperative to me, at least, that we must reverse the process. More emphasis must be placed in educating the children than trying to reverse age-old teaching in the minds of adults. Yet I have never seen a comprehensive Sunday School curriculum developed and promoted for use in Sunday School. I suspect some may say that the minds of adults must be changed in order for a new approach to teaching children be accepted. Perhaps if a good curriculum is presented to adults for consideration not only will the children receive enlightened teaching, but it will surely rub off on adults. I have long thought that the poorest paid teachers, those in the lowest grades, should be the highest paid. The emphasis should be on teaching the desire to learn. If done well the rest will be so much easier. That applies to all the books you have written (which I have read) and also books that Crossan, Borg, etal have written: "A Little Child Shall Lead Them.” Have we overlooked a vital link in our religious education of the flock?

Read the Answer...

4 May 2011: Rush Limbaugh vs. Lawrence O’Donnell – What Would Jesus Cut?

The political debate, as it is viewed on the twenty-four hour a day cable news television channels, is frequently more amusing than informative. The necessity of keeping an audience glued to the set means that insignificant things are hyped into being major stories. There is indeed a crisis a day, sometimes elevating political nonsense into …

Read More…

Q & A:

I in no way intend to belittle you or cause you to become angry over this e-mail. I am a born-again Christian putting my complete faith in Jesus Christ as my savior because I am a sinner and have no way to heaven except through the Son. I thank God every day for opening my eyes and showing me the path to salvation. I just want to take a second of your time after reading your thoughts on Judas and ask why you haven’t investigated in Acts 1:12-21 when Luke tells of how “The Eleven” became “The Twelve” again after adding Matthias to the disciples and how the disciples quote the Old Testament telling of the one that will betray the Messiah, and by you saying this never happened, then you are bringing into question not only the authenticity of the gospels, but of the whole Old Testament and New Testament. I ask that you sincerely delve into the issue and ask yourself why you are really making these claims. You talked about when Paul wrote about Jesus returning and showing himself to Cephas (Peter) and the twelve. Isn’t this the newly-formed twelve (with Matthias as the twelfth)? And couldn’t Jesus have appeared to the eleven (in Matthew) because they had not yet added Matthias? I know it is okay to ask questions, but you aren’t doing a good job answering your questions thoroughly. I am afraid you are trying to destroy the gospel piece by piece instead of truly seeking the truth. I pray the Lord will change your mind and that he will be able to open your eyes so that you might believe in him. Thank you for your time and consideration.

Read the Answer...

28 April 2011: Peter J. Gomes, 1942-2011, Preacher Par Excellence

Both the United States and world Christianity lost one of its more preeminent voices recently with the death of Peter J. Gomes, the Plummer Professor of Christian Morals at the Harvard Divinity School and the Pusey Minister of Memorial Church at Harvard. He was a friend, a prophet and a remarkable human being. The public …

Read More…

Q & A:

I am a big fan of yours and the work you have done over the years. I met you in Charlotte when you lectured at the Gay and Lesbian Center and then arranged for you to speak at Unity Church of Greater Hartford even though I was unfortunately unable to attend as I was there on a one-year assignment as Transitional Minister. I am also a big fan of Rocco Errico and the understanding he brings to the Bible from being a disciple of George Lamsa, who grew up in Kurdistan and spoke Aramaic as his native language. It seems that Rocco makes a big point of his belief that the New Testament was written in Aramaic first and then translated into Greek. I don’t think that’s true but I do find enormous help from his understanding of the Aramaic language and his understanding of Semitic thinking, customs and culture. As a small example, according to Dr. Errico, the phrase “a burning bush which would not be consumed” is a Semitic idiom which means having a big problem which won’t go away. I’ve always interpreted that to mean that Moses knew it was his mission, his guidance to get the Israelites out of Egypt and humanly he didn’t want to accept this guidance.

Read the Answer...

In Need of a Good Word?

We encourage you to show your support for positive and progressive Christian views by becoming a part of Bishop Spong's growing online community. You'll receive a new column each week on topics in social justice and spirituality that matter most.

Join the Movement

Free Q&A Email

Sign up for Bishop Spong's FREE weekly Q&A email.

Browse by Date

Browse our monthly archives:

Connect on Facebook